Estimating the weighted prevalence of anxiety disorders in breast cancer patients using a Two-stage approach

  • Olamijulo A Fatiregun Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos.
  • Oluseun Peter Ogunnubi Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9733-6325
  • Omolara A Fatiregun Oncology Unit, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja. Lagos, Nigeria
  • Bolutife O Oyatokun Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Osunwale Dahunsi Oni Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
  • Adebayo R Erinfolami Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria.
  • Joseph D Adeyemi Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria.
Keywords: Anxiety disorder, Two-stage Survey, Breast cancer, Pattern

Abstract

Background: A two-stage survey is useful when the actual diagnostic interview is time-consuming and expensive to administer on the general population.

Objective: To compare Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in the determination of the prevalence of anxiety disorder in patients with breast cancer.

Methods: A cross-sectional study of 200 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer attending the Oncology Out-Patients Clinic of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, Lagos, Nigeria was done. The instruments used for the survey included a socio-demographic questionnaire, the HADS and the SCAN.

Results: The mean age of the subjects was 49.6 ± 11.2 years. Majority of the subjects (76.5%) were married. Using HADS with a threshold score of ≥ 8, 53 (26.5%) met the criteria for probable anxiety disorders (herein called ‘cases’). Of the 68 patients (all 53 ‘cases’ plus 15 randomly selected 10% of the non-cases) interviewed with the SCAN instrument, only 38 met the criteria for diagnosis of anxiety disorder.

Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety disorders can be determined with greater precision using the two-stage design approach. Diagnostic tools like SCAN should therefore be incorporated in the assessment protocols for patients with breast cancer and other illnesses.

Author Biographies

Olamijulo A Fatiregun, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos.
Consultant Psychiatrist, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos.
Oluseun Peter Ogunnubi, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos

Lecturer I, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos.

Omolara A Fatiregun, Oncology Unit, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja. Lagos, Nigeria

Consultant Oncologist, Oncology Unit, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja. Lagos, Nigeria

Bolutife O Oyatokun, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
Senior Registrar, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
Osunwale Dahunsi Oni, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria
Adebayo R Erinfolami, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria.

Consultant Psychiatrist, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria.

Joseph D Adeyemi, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria.
Consultant Psychiatrist, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, and Professor, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-araba, Lagos, Nigeria. Email:

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Published
2018-06-17
Section
Original Research